Activity Based Funding Conference

5 – 6 May 2022 | Virtual and free

Plenary

Prof Ruth Hubbard

Masonic Chair of Geriatric Medicine, University of Queensland

    Speaker Biography

    Prof Ruth Hubbard is a consultant geriatrician at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland, and in October 2020, she was appointed the Masonic Chair in Geriatric Medicine at the University of Queensland.

    She has published widely on the inflammatory aetiology of frailty; the difficulties of measuring frailty in clinical practice; and the relationships between frailty and obesity, smoking, socioeconomic status and exercise. Based on the impact of her publications, she is currently ranked number three in a list of frailty experts worldwide.

    As a passionate advocate for her discipline, Prof Hubbard is promoting academic geriatrics among Advanced Trainees, medical students and Allied Health colleagues. She is currently supervising five clinicians undertaking PhDs as well as numerous student projects. She has generated more than $9.3 million in grant income in the last five years, including as Chief Investigator on two National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grants.

    What inspired you to enter your field of work, and what drives you to continue with your specific research?

    As a junior doctor, I was struck by the differences in health among people of the same chronological age and dismayed by the simplistic ways this was described by senior colleagues e.g. ‘Very good for 85’. I was motivated to undertake my research to explore whether a measure of frailty could capture health status with more precision.

    What does sustainability in health care mean in your work or research?

    The ageing of the population is the greatest challenge facing healthcare systems. To me, sustainability in health care means designing models of care to meet the needs of frail older people with complex comorbidities, rather than younger, fitter patients who have one problem at a time.

    Where do you see the biggest opportunities for innovation in your work or research?

    The vision of my research group is to ensure that all inpatients receive treatment that is appropriate for their frailty status and helps them achieve their own goals of care. To achieve this at scale would require significant innovation – systematisation of frailty measurement, and collaboration and communication with specialist colleagues to help them understand how frailty status impacts the risks and benefits of interventions.

    Presentation

    Watch Prof Ruth Hubbard's keynote address Measuring frailty to capture patient complexity.

    There are no upcoming presentations currently scheduled for this speaker.

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